Warm summery days are finally here, but with the sunshine comes a whole host of tips to keep your pets safe in the nice weather.
One of the dangers to worry about is heat stroke, which can be more common in dogs than humans due to the less efficient way they release heat from their bodies. The best way to avoid this occurrence is by being aware of the situations that could leave your dog in a position particularly vulnerable to the summer heat:


One of the dangers to worry about is heat stroke, which can be more common in dogs than humans due to the less efficient way they release heat from their bodies. The best way to avoid this occurrence is by being aware of the situations that could leave your dog in a position particularly vulnerable to the summer heat:

  • over-exercise on hot days
  • leaving dogs in cars for even short periods of time
  • lack of hydration, especially when being active outdoors

Make sure you are keeping track of your pet’s reactions to the heat, the intensity of their panting or the extent of their lethargy and are providing plenty of water throughout the day.
Another safety issue to be increasingly aware of as the warmer months loom can be found in the common thread between many of our favorite summer past-times: water. Specifically, the things that live or die in water:

  • Algae – we frequently encounter toxic algae blooms and overgrowth in the greater Seattle area, and it’s important to pay attention to beach notices about toxic algae and avoid those beaches until the notices are lifted
  • Parasites – wherever there is a presence of water fowl, there can be a risk of water parasites
  • Dead fish – any dead fish on beaches can pose the risk of salmon poisoning, but this can mostly be avoided by not allowing your dog to roll in or ingest dead fish.

It’s a good idea to thoroughly rinse your dog after they swim, or even just wade, in area waters to try to avoid any of these unfortunate repercussions. If your dog does seem unwell after being exposed to infected water or fish, give us a call at 425.242.4057. You can also find veterinary resources for after-hours and emergency care on our website.

Looking for more useful tips and tidbits for taking care of your pet? We have a database full of online pet health articles available to the public that you can peruse at any time to better prepare yourself and your pet for things as simple as summer weather or as complicated as a month-long road-trip.